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Kitchener retirement homes

The complete guide to finding a retirement community in the Kitchener region

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The city of Kitchener is situated in southern Ontario, 100 km west of the province’s capital, Toronto. The metropolitan area around the city known as the Region of Waterloo includes Kitchener and the smaller cities of Cambridge and Waterloo. Retirement homes in Kitchener have both assisted living and active senior apartments and the city offers affordable housing, as well as a variety of seniors’ services and plenty of recreational programs spread throughout the three cities.

This is your guide to finding the right senior community and care in the Kitchener region.

Contents

List of retirement homes in Kitchener

Some of the best retirement homes in Kitchener are listed below. Click to view a community's full profile, or refine your search by accessing the map or advanced search views.


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The Village of Winston Park

The Village of Winston Park

695 Block Line Road, Kitchener, Ontario, N2E 3K1
This elegant retirement residence in Kitchener-Waterloo offers a continuum of care from long-term care to assisted living to independent living seniors apartments.
Chartwell Bankside Terrace Retirement Residence

Chartwell Bankside Terrace Retirement Residence

71 Bankside Drive, Kitchener, Ontario, N2N 3L1
Chartwell Westmount Retirement Residence

Chartwell Westmount Retirement Residence

190 David Bergey Drive, Kitchener, Ontario, N2E 0E7
Chartwell Terrace on the Square Retirement Residence

Chartwell Terrace on the Square Retirement Residence

100 Caroline Street South, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 1X5
The Westhill

The Westhill

25 Westhill Drive, Waterloo, Ontario, N2T 0B6
The Westhill is an inviting atmosphere of new friends and great times, with personalized support services for better living. The Westhill is conveniently located in Waterloo, near The Boardwalk shopping area.
Chartwell Queen's Square Retirement Residence

Chartwell Queen's Square Retirement Residence

10 Melville Street North, Cambridge, Ontario, N1S 1H5
Chartwell Elmira Retirement Residence

Chartwell Elmira Retirement Residence

8 Snyder Avenue North, Elmira, Ontario, N3B 2B1
Chartwell Wellington Park Retirement Residence

Chartwell Wellington Park Retirement Residence

181 Janefield Ave, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 1V2

Types of senior care in Kitchener

Retirement residences and communities in Ontario can be broken into a few basic categories, the main ones being: independent living, assisted living, and long-term care (nursing homes). A full spectrum of care can be found in the Kitchener region, (see image below).

Independent and assisted living

Retirement homes in Kitchener will most often offer a continuum of care, where residents can transition from living unassisted in a community for the companionship and amenities to gradually receiving more care and support as needed. Choosing a retirement home in Kitchener with all three options allow residents to stay within the same community and support network as their needs change.

Long-term care

Seniors with more challenging health needs and can benefit from the more comprehensive care provided in long-term care. 24 hour care, secure facilities and special therapies available in residential care can help those struggling with illnesses and cognitive disabilities such as Alzheimer’s and Dementia. In long-term care, residents can feel safe in a familiar, secure and home-like environment and receive the personal care they need. The phrase "nursing homes," still used colloquially by some people, is no longer used in the long-term care industry.

To narrow your search in Kitchener, click on a care type below:

How much do retirement home suites cost in Kitchener?

The monthly rent of a retirement home in Kitchener depends greatly on the type of suite and level of care you choose. To give you a rough idea of costs, however, the average monthly cost for a standard care unit in Ontario is $3,200.

Some of the most common ways of paying for retirement are through savings, pensions, Canadian Pension Plan (CPP) and Old Age Pension. The sale of the family home is also a good way to finance retirement costs.

The Ontario government can be helpful when it comes to additional expenses, such as home care or prescription expenses. Seniors with high prescription drug costs relative to their income may benefit from applying to the Trillium Drug Program. Seniors over the age of 65 who live in Ontario and have a valid Ontario health card are eligible for application.

Along with a host of retirement communities, Kitchener offers an affordable housing program for those seniors who want to remain in a home of their own.

Medical services and safety

Of Kitchener’s 204,000 residents, 25 percent are seniors, and this percentage is growing. Many of Kitchener’s seniors enjoy the benefits of living in a retirement residence – from the safe environment and day-to-day assistance to the social and community aspects. Most modern retirement homes provide their own health and wellness care, but also help to connect them to health care centres in the area. 

Kitchener residents have access to all the essential services one would expect from a growing Canadian city. In addition to the care provided in residences there are also three local hospitals within the Kitchener-Waterloo area: The Grand River Hospital, St. Mary’s General Hospital, and Cambridge Memorial Hospital.

Although it’s good to know the nearest hospital is not too far away, today’s understanding of health care encompasses more than just emergency services. Active living, healthy eating, and staying safe are all part of a healthy lifestyle – especially for seniors – and Kitchener ‘s retirement homes provide a variety of services and programs that cater to all these branches of wellness.

Some examples of health and wellness services provided in independent and assisted living residences include:

  • An on-site doctor, or a doctor who visits residents on a regular basis
  • On-site nursing staff, often available 24/7
  • An on-site pharmacy and medication assistance services
  • Exercise programs with access to a personal trainer
  • Physiotherapy
  • Preventative wellness programs
  • Recuperative programs
  • Dietary and nutritional programs
  • Assistance with daily living activities including bathing, dressing, nutrition and mobility
  • Assistance with lifestyle maintenance including outings, social engagements and pet care
  • Continence management programs
  • Palliative care services

To ensure the meals served in retirement homes are both healthy and delicious, a dietician and/or trained chef are part of the staff team in assisted living and long-term care. Meals can be tailored to residents’ dietary and faith needs, and snacks are offered at some residences to help residents sleep better and regulate blood sugar.

One of the greatest advantages of living in a retirement residence is living in a safe environment. With resident safety as their first priority, most retirement suites are equipped with emergency-call systems, specially designed bathrooms with sit-down showers, non-slip floors and night-lighting. Long-term care homes with Alzheimer’s care and Dementia care also offer secure floors and 24/7 nursing.

Recreation and social activities

All across Canada, seniors are the largest growing demographic. With 2011 being the first year of a predicted 20 year seniors boom, Kitchener is investing along with many Ontario cities to provide retired Canadians with the means to keep themselves healthy: physically and mentally. 

Staying social is a vital part of staying happy and healthy as you age. With this in mind, the city has implemented programs such as “Bridging the Gap”, which hopes to help ease the transition to retirement, and the multifaceted SHARE support program, which employs volunteers of all ages, mostly other seniors, to help older adults through difficult times. Divorced and separated, grieving, or lonely adults over 55, as well as caregivers can come together through this program to form peer support groups – proven to greatly improve mental health and a sense of community.

Along with support programs, Kitchener’s three locations for senior wellness and community also run ongoing recreational programs and serve as meeting places for dozens of seniors groups that share interests. The Breithaupt CentreDowntown Community Community Centre and Rockway Centre offer everything from singing clubs and crochet circles to swimming and dance programs, all of which can be found in Kitchener’s “Best of Times” newsletter and program guide specifically targeted to it’s senior community.

As a whole, retirement residences are social places with many recreational oportunities. Retirement homes often employ an activity consultant, responsible for organizing outings and recreational and leisure activities to keep residents active and social. For seniors who are looking to keep fit, retirement communities have facilities for all kinds of sport and fitness. Many have pools, as well as gyms and courts. 

The city’s landscape also lends itself well to outdoor excursions. Kitchener’s parks and trails are also an excellent option for anyone who wants to explore nature or just get some fresh air.

The tri-city area around Kitchener is alive and well with arts, culture and celebration. The Waterloo region has many restaurants, and several libraries and shopping malls, and is home to no less than seven museums and historic sites and ten art galleries, many of which have free admission or special discounts for grandparents. Patrons of the theatre and music-lovers also have nine different theatre spaces and concert halls to visit. Seniors can explore these at their leisure, but retirement homes often make it easier to discover the city’s attractions by organizing nights out, shopping trips, and tours by accessible bus. 

Kitchener, known sometimes as the “little Germany” of Ontario for its large German population, is also the site of many festivals from many different cultures – although Oktober Fest and the Christkindl Markt (Christmas market) still remain among some of the most popular. Some of the other favourites within the senior community include:

  • Cruising on King Street (hundreds of classic cars on display)
  • Kitchener Blues Festival
  • KW Multicultural Festival

One of the unique events created for and by seniors in conjunction with the city is called “Salute to Seniors”. The event, started by the Mayor’s Advisory Council for Kitchener Seniors (MACKS)  , is a way to recognize the contributions senior citizens have made and celebrate the positive presence of the older community. In addition to organizing the annual salute, MACKS, a 12 person council of senior volunteers, is also responsible for:

  • Advising city staff and council on issues related to older adults
  • Keeping strong links with provincial and national older-adult organizations
  • Promoting a positive view of seniors

Residents of retirement homes have the opportunity to engage in celebrations and exercise their creativity both in the the community and within their residence. Art, dance and music classes, performances and concerts by volunteers, and residence parties all make modern retirement homes vibrant places to live.

Transportation for Kitchener seniors

Although there’s no shortage of things to keep busy with in Kitchener, getting around is often the largest hurdle for older adults to overcome. Retirement communities and the city both have options for those who no longer drive and are looking for public or private transportation anywhere – from health services to community festivals.

Some retirement residences have their own transportation and organize excursions, especially for residents with disabilities. Otherwise, public transit is always available to seniors. The city has a comprehensive public transit system that travels around the whole region of Waterloo, and offers reduced prices for seniors.

A city-funded MobilityPLUS service can help those with difficulty walking and boarding get around. Residents can register for MobilityPLUS to pick them up, but must book trips a couple days in advance. To make sure no seniors are left out due to limited mobility, the city also funds the seniors day initiative, which helps older adults with health and mobility problems participate in social activities by providing volunteer transportation and assistance.

Choosing a retirement community

Finding the right retirement home for you  or your loved one(s) is all about being prepared. Many seniors and their families wait until a time of crisis until they consider retirement homes. Starting your search during a difficult time can limit your options and increase stress. Whether you or your loved one(s) plans to live at home or is excited about moving into a retirement community, it is important to consider all your options.

For more points to consider and some common questions and concerns about retirement homes, please visit our page for seniors considering a retirement home.

Before you begin your search, first ask yourself the following:

  • What you want
  • What you need
  • What you can afford
  • Your preferred location

Use our retirement calculator to get an idea of what you’ll be able to afford in your retirement.

The next step is looking for potential Kitchener retirement residences. Use our advanced search http://www.comfortlife.ca/find-communities to create a shortlist of communities that meet your wants and needs.

Asking questions is one of the most important parts of the process. If you are unsure about what questions to ask and what to look for on your visits, download our eBook on the ultimate retirement tour guide.

Remember to ask about overnight stays - some will let seniors stay overnight in a guest suite to get a better idea of what it’s like to live in the community. Choosing a retirement home can take time, but it doesn’t have to be stressful. Get started today by searching our website, or contacting the Kitchener residences below.

Retirement home regulations

When it comes to safety within Kitchener’s retirement communities, every residence across Ontario is subject to the Retirement Home Regulatory Authority (RHRA). In order to remain operational, homes must receive approval from this authority and undertake ongoing inspections in order to ensure a standard of safety for retired residents.

When choosing a retirement home, always make sure to check the RHRA standing. Industry experts also recommend looking for a retirement community with ORCA accreditation. Many retirement communities in Kitchener are members of the Ontario Retirement Communities Association, a voluntary association for retirement homes throughout the province.

In addition to accreditations and the regulations set by the RHRA, the Long-Term Care Homes Act, 2007 governs all long-term care homes in Ontario. The act requires residences to provide safe, consistent and high-quality resident-centred care and makes sure residents feel at home, are treated with dignity and respect, and have the health care services they need available to them.

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