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Queensview Retirement Community
Queensview Retirement Community
70 King Edward Street
Paris, Ontario, N3L 2G8
Queensview Retirement Community
 

Queensview Retirement Community

70 King Edward Street, Paris, Ontario, N3L 2G8

Cost (from):
$1,995 per month
Capacity:
198
Total Suites:
99

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Queensview Retirement Community

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Queensview Retirement Community

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Contact Name:
Amanda Walker or Karen Barnett

Phone Number:



Address:
70 King Edward Street, Paris, Ontario, N3L 2G8
about this community

About this community:

Queensview Retirement Community offers Studio Villas starting at $1995 & 1-2 bedroom apartments starting at $2886, with ample parking. Monthly rentals include kitchenette, all meals, snacks, beverages, weekly housekeeping, laundering of linens & towels, 24hr emergency response by nursing & support workers. Enjoy scheduled exercise classes & robust activities. Independent/assisted care & pricing can be customized to meet your changing needs. We offer permanent, short term & recuperation stays.

Year Founded: 2013
Ownership Type: profit
Languages Spoken: English

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Level of Care

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community


Health Services:

  • Vitals monitoring (with no special assistance)
  • Ostomy care (with special assistance)
  • Catheter care (with special assistance)
  • Cognitively impaired residents (with special assistance)
  • Physically challenged residents (with no special assistance)
  • Feeding tube assistance (with special assistance)
  • Oxygen assistance (with no special assistance)
  • Medication by pen (with special assistance)
  • Chart by exception (with special assistance)

Care options available:

  • Guest stays available
  • Respite care available
  • Private home-care allowed
  • Palliative care available
  • Convalescent care
 Independent Living

We strive to create customized care and to accommodate special requests. We use nurses and personal support workers to manage the care of all our residents

Details
Cost from$2,886
Designated dining areaYes
MealsIncluded (3x/day )
Daily tidyExtra fee
HousekeepingIncluded (1x/week )
Bathing assistanceExtra fee
Medication administrationExtra fee

 Assisted Living

We customize care programs to suit each resident. Please call to discuss your care needs. Karen Barnett at 519 442 5621

Details
Cost from$3,326
Designated dining areaYes
Cancer careExtra fee
DiabetesExtra fee
DialysisExtra fee
Huntington's DiseaseExtra fee
Multiple SclerosisExtra fee
Stroke careExtra fee
MealsIncluded (3x/day )
Daily tidyIncluded
HousekeepingIncluded (1x/week )
Bathing assistanceIncluded (1x/week )
Dressing assistanceIncluded
Feeding assistanceIncluded
Transfer assistanceIncluded
Incontinence careExtra fee
Medication administrationIncluded
Resident RemindersIncluded


Amenities & Services

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details

Residence Amenities & Services

  • Arts and crafts
  • Emergency call system (pendent)
  • Games Room
  • Hairdresser
  • Hobby kitchen
  • Internet
  • Laundry machines
  • Library
  • Mail box
  • Newspaper delivery available to suite
  • Newspapers delivered to concierge
  • Onsite foot care
  • Parking (outdoor)
  • Party room
  • Patio/Courtyard/BBQ
  • Pet friendly
  • Private bus for outings, regular trips
  • Private dining room for family/friends
  • Recreation facilities onsite
  • Religious Services & Holiday Celebrations
  • Spa Services
  • Spa tub or shower room
  • Spa/Beauty Salon
  • Walking Path
  • Wheelchair (electric)
  • Wheelchair (scooter)
  • Wheelchair Accessible


Programs & Activities

  • Arts and Crafts
  • Assisted Walks/Trails
  • Bingo
  • Bocce Ball
  • Card Games
  • Entertainment
  • Excursions
  • Exercise Program
  • Gardening
  • Movie Nights
  • Parties
  • Religious & Holiday Services
  • Shuffleboard
  • Theatre
  • Volunteering
  • Weekly Shopping Trips & Excursions


Dining

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dining

We prepare all meal fresh daily. If a resident falls ill we are happy to bring meals to their suites. We have a culinary manager on staff.


Meal Service

  • Bistro: Resident & family (24 hours)
  • Buffet
  • Room Service (extra fee)
  • Table service
  • Tray service in suite (extra fee)

Seating Type

  • Assigned seating
  • Open seating

Special Diets

  • Diabetic
  • Gluten Free
  • Low sodium
  • Puree foods
  • Vegetarian

Staffing

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staffing
Medical Staff
Registered Practical Nurses
Personal Support Workers
DoctorOn call
DentistNot available
PhysiotherapistNot available
ChiropodistNot available

Suites

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suite
TypeOwnershipCost/mth fromSizeCompanion feeAmenitiesContact
StudioRent$1,995490sq/ft+$399
  • Cable TV in room (additional fee)
  • Call Bell System
  • Kitchen
  • Personal phone number in room (additional Fee)
email
1-bedroomRent$2,886426sq/ft+$699
  • Cable TV in room (additional fee)
  • Call Bell System
  • Kitchenette
  • Mini-fridge
  • Personal phone number in room (additional Fee)
email
2-bedroomRent$3,796700sq/ft+$699
  • Cable TV in room (additional fee)
  • Call Bell System
  • Kitchenette
  • Mini-fridge
  • Patio/Balcony
  • Personal phone number in room (additional Fee)
email
1-bedroom + denRent$3,492565sq/ft+$699
  • Cable TV in room (additional fee)
  • Call Bell System
  • Kitchenette
  • Mini-fridge
  • Patio/Balcony
  • Personal phone number in room (additional Fee)
email
  • Type:
  • Ownership: Rent
  • Cost: $1,995
  • Size: 490sq/ft
  • Cost mth/from: +$399
  • Details:
    • Cable TV in room (additional fee)
    • Call Bell System
    • Kitchen
    • Personal phone number in room (additional Fee)
  • Contact: email

  • Type:
  • Ownership: Rent
  • Cost: $2,886
  • Size: 426sq/ft
  • Cost mth/from: +$699
  • Details:
    • Cable TV in room (additional fee)
    • Call Bell System
    • Kitchenette
    • Mini-fridge
    • Personal phone number in room (additional Fee)
  • Contact: email

  • Type:
  • Ownership: Rent
  • Cost: $3,796
  • Size: 700sq/ft
  • Cost mth/from: +$699
  • Details:
    • Cable TV in room (additional fee)
    • Call Bell System
    • Kitchenette
    • Mini-fridge
    • Patio/Balcony
    • Personal phone number in room (additional Fee)
  • Contact: email

  • Type:
  • Ownership: Rent
  • Cost: $3,492
  • Size: 565sq/ft
  • Cost mth/from: +$699
  • Details:
    • Cable TV in room (additional fee)
    • Call Bell System
    • Kitchenette
    • Mini-fridge
    • Patio/Balcony
    • Personal phone number in room (additional Fee)
  • Contact: email


  • Neighbourhood

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    neighbourhood

    Paris_ The cobblestone capital of Canada, is surrounded by lakes, apple trees , streams and countryside. The residence is located atop a hill that has beautiful views. We frequently take excursions to explore our beautiful area.

    Nearby:


    Move-in Requirements

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    admission

    We customize our care for each resident and would be happy to discuss any concerns or questions you may have Please call Karen Barnett: 519 442 5621

    • Chest x-ray
    • Personal Interview

    Stories & Testimonials

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    stories

    Moving into a Senior Retirement Communityexpand

    RETIREMENT COMMUNITY LIVING
    Your Questions Answered by Dawn Lyons

     

     

    Dawn is the GM of Queensview Retirement Community, and has over 25 years of experience. If you have any questions on retirement living email: [email protected]

     

    Moving into a Senior Retirement Community.

     

    Having made the decision to move into a retirement community, it’s time to start planning and packing.  Here are a few tips to get you started.

     

    Make a plan:

    Ask yourself how much of the moving process you want to do yourself. Will you hire a move manager or movers to just do the moving or will they do the packing?

    Ask for help!

    Moving is exciting but may also be overwhelming. Allow others to join with you in both the joy and physical work of the move. Plan well ahead to ensure you have plenty of help on your schedule, and when you need it.

    Plan out your space:

    Request a floor plan with dimensions and then start placing your “must haves”.

    Let go/ Share with others:

    Think about exactly what you will need to make you feel at home and settled in the space you will have in your new home. Try to do this when you are calm and rested and start with the largest pieces, then your most treasured smaller ones.

    Once this is decided, everything else can go to family, charity and friends. Remember less is more.

    Use Coloured  Stickers, or Post it Notes to identify the boxes and items:

    Use colored stickers to identify what is going with you and be sure to clearly mark the contents of boxes.

    We are committed to providing you and your family whatever is necessary to start your new journey with peace of mind. With decades of experience and hundreds of seniors happily settled in, Queensview is a warm and welcoming choice to call home.

     

    Moving into Senior Housing: Adapting the Old, Embracing the New 

    VISIT, LIVE IT, LOVE IT  

    We invite you to join us and experience Queensview Retirement Community in person.We offer independent and enhanced care, short term and recuperative stays.

    We provide complimentary consultations, home visits and personalized orientations.

    ...



    Safety in Driving - When it's time to talkexpand

    RETIREMENT COMMUNITY LIVING 

    Your Questions Answered by Dawn Lyons

    Dawn Lyons General Manager, Queensview Retirement Community

    THE BEST IN THE WORLD OVER 50s HOUSING MULTI-YEAR WINNER Visit,Live it,Love it

    70 King Edward Street,Paris,Ont

    As General Manager of Queensview Retirement Community, and over 25 years of experience, I know that more of us are needing to make smart retirement decisions and I’m happy to help. Email me your inquiries on retirement living: [email protected] It is important to know when, and how, to transition our aging loved ones from driver to passenger, at the same time maintaining their self-esteem, sense of independence and, most importantly, freedom. To be certain the news will be difficult to hear ; however, if approached the right way, it can be less stressful than expected. Tip of the week: Plan to have more than one conversation: Approach the subject gradually. Time the conversations carefully: Ideally, the conversations should start before there’s a problem. If you see signs that your loved one is having trouble behind the wheel, start the discussion immediately. Choose the messenger carefully. Your loved one may prefer to have the discussion with a spouse rather than with children,or with another peer such as a sibling or close friend. Do your homework: Observe your loved one behind the wheel.Talkwithhisorherdoctorabout any health conditions or medications that may affect driving ability. Seize opportunities. Health changes, near-accidents and actual accidents all open the door to a conversation about driving. Suggest screenings: Hospitals and other health facilities

    may offer evaluations for older drivers or assessment through the Ministryof Transportation or research for certified Driver Instructor in your area. Expect push back: Giving up the keys means giving up independence and self-reliance. Be sensitive to this, and if possible have a plan that will keep them as independent as possible. Suggest gradual cut backs: Instead of giving up driving cold turkey, a driver could reduce the number of hours on the road or start driving only during the day time on familiar routes. Have solutions ready: Research alternatives to driving, such as nearby public transit, senior transportation services in your loved one’s community, carpools, or family members or friends who would be willing and able to give rides. Take the keys: If all else fails, it might become necessary to confiscate the keys, disable the vehicle, or remove it altogether. If a senior doesn’t remember that he or she is not supposed to drive. Personal safety and the safety of others, must be at the heart of all discussions.  A visit, or a lunch are good ways to experiencethecommunity.Evenbetter, try an overnight stay as this will enable you to connect with residents and talk with them about their experiences. Queensview Retirement Community offers independent, enhanced, short termandrecuperativestays.Weprovide complimentary consultations, home visits and personalized orientations. We are here for you, please call us at 519-442-5621.Queensviewrc.ca

    ...



    Therapeutic Tub Experience... It's not just a bathexpand

    Health and Wellness is an essential care element at Queensview.

    The new therapeutic tub and massage chair are now available to be booked.

    A new amenity for our residents!

    For decades , Doctors have been praising the benefits of hydrotherapy on our health including, pain relief, enhanced mobility, reduction of symptoms associated with arthritis and overall well being. Our therapeutic tub is temperature controlled and full of whirlpool jets that create air bubbles to gently massage your body. This improves blood circulation, decreases blood pressure and generally you will feel better during and post your treatment. The tub experience will leave you feeling more relaxed, because the water will remove the weight off your body and many of our residents feel their joint pain is relieved for quite some time.

    Water flows to your neck, immerses your entire body, and the sculptured seat is designed to provide maximum comfort. 

    A personal support worker is always there to ensure safety, and you have complete privacy. 

    To book a service or purchase a service for your loved one, please contact us.

     

    ...



    Alzheimers - Finding your wayexpand

    January is National Alzheimers month.

    Please take the time to view this video:

    It’s a  special message from Mario Sergio the Minister Responsible for Seniors Affairs on Alzheimer Awareness Month. How this January, we acknowledge the many Ontarians affected by these conditions, and encourage all Ontarians to learn more about the disease and how they can help those seniors and families affected! http://bit.ly/1ObeJi4

    This video talks about the Finding your way program……get informed this month.

    ...



    January is Alzheimers Monthexpand

    Did you know:January is National Alzheimers Month. It is a disease that impacts so many of us in profound ways. Thank you to the Alzheimer's Society for all the work you do in our communities- here's how you can help:

    Each January thousands of Canadians participate in Walk for Alzheimer's, Make Memories Matter- you can participate,sponsor or donate to make a difference and strive for a world without this disease; here is the link:

    http://www.alzheimer.ca/en/News-and-Events/events/walk-for-alzheimers

    ​If a family member has been recently diagnosed with Alzheimer's or Dementia be sure to check out this great hand book on First Steps for Families:

    http://www.alzheimer.ca/~/media/Files/national/Core-lit-brochures/First_Steps_for_Families_e.pdf

    ...



    Making Family Memoriesexpand

    RETIREMENT COMMUNITY LIVING
    Your Questions Answered by Dawn Lyons

     

     

     

    As General Manager of Queensview Retirement Community, and over 25 years of experience, I’m happy to help with any questions you may have with regard to living a good life in retirement. Email me your inquiries on retirement living: [email protected]

     

    MAKING FAMILY MEMORIES

    During this  holiday season it is a great time to take steps to preserve your family's memories because if your family doesn't have a storyteller, family history could eventually disappear. These ideas may help inspire you to make memories and help your parents leave a legacy for the generations to come.

    Gather Those Family Photos

    Those shoeboxes full of disorganized photos, stacks of dusty photo albums, and slides no one has looked at for years are a treasure chest of memories waiting to spring back to life by digitally scanning old prints and then save them onto CDs or DVDs or an external hard drive to make a digital scrapbook.

    Get Your Pen Ready

    Listening to seniors re-tell their stories of old, but we now need to start captioning those stories by, life writing activities. These may be done individually or at family gatherings. In group activities, members are encouraged to prepare, in advance, information about family relationships, life accomplishments, school, work and major life. Recording or transcribing your talks will create documentation of their life that will be a priceless resource to you after they are gone and to many relatives that will come after them.

    Collect Family Recipes

    Many families strengthen their bond and maintain their identity by passing on recipes from generation to generation. A recipe book can be one of the most powerful ways to leave a legacy because it takes us back to the table, or kitchen where it all began; where the childhood memories started. Encourage the younger children to voice which dishes, or baking, they love the best. In collecting all of our family’s recipes in one place, we are creating a treasure for many generations to enjoy, no matter where they are living and the connection it creates is a strong one.

     

     

     

     

    Create a Memory Treasure Chest

     A memory treasure chest box should reflect the interests or a moment in history that has meaning to the individual and future generations. The box should be large enough to accommodate meaningful items from the past such as jewelry, toys, family pictures, memorabilia from a trip, ribbons, buttons, cards, drawings, old love letters, poems, your corsage or boutonniere from your high school prom, a playbill from the first date with your spouse. Involving your family as much as possible will make your presence in their memories even stronger.

     

    At Queensview we are part of your Memory Treasure Chest and we know it is essential that family and friends are able to not only remember your life, but also celebrate it. There are many ways to ensure this can happen, but perhaps the most touching and lasting way is by leaving a personal remembrance for to those you love.

     

    VISIT, LIVE IT, LOVE IT  

    A visit, or a lunch are good ways to experience the community. Even better, try an overnight stay as this will enable you to connect with residents and talk with them about their experiences. Queensview Retirement Community offers independent, enhanced, short term and recuperative stays. We provide complimentary consultations, home visits and personalized orientations. We are here for you, please call us at 519 442 5621.

     

    Queensviewrc.ca

     

     

    ...



    Preparing for unique challenges in the wintertimeexpand

    As General Manager of Queensview Retirement Community, and over 25 years of experience, I know that more of us are needing to make smart retirement decisions and we’re happy to help. Email me, Dawn Lyons,  your inquiries on retirement living: [email protected]

     

     Preparing for the unique challenges of wintertime weather.

     

    Chilling temperatures and treacherous winter conditions can terrorize our seniors and their caregivers during the winter months.

    Here are a few things to keep in mind to help keep seniors safe during the frigid season ahead.

    Ice and snow-Sidewalks slick with ice and snow pose a serious falling hazard for an elderly person. Make sure that the porch, driveway, sidewalk, etc. of the senior has been thoroughly cleaned and a layer of sand and salt has been applied. If necessary hire an outside service to do the heavy lifting. Make sure that their footwear is well fitting, and comfortable, and that their cane or walker has new winter pick or treads.

    Dress for Warmth-Cold temperatures can lead to frostbite and hypothermia — a condition where the body temperature dips too low. Wearing layers will help regulate body temperature both inside and out. If you are going outside, wear warm socks, a heavy coat, a warm hat, gloves and a scarf. In very cold temperatures, cover all exposed skin. Use a scarf to cover your mouth and protect your lungs.

     Disaster kit-Winter storms can be fierce enough to knock down power lines and forcibly confine seniors to their homes. It is essential to make sure a senior is equipped with a disaster kit to help them get through these times. Stock up the cupboard with a week’s supply of non-perishable food and drinking water. Get your senior a hand-operated can opener to use during power outages. Make sure there is a flashlight in the home with back up batteries.

    Fill prescriptions of critical medications-Don’t let important meds run low during the winter.  Switch your senior’s prescriptions to a local pharmacy that makes home deliveries or sign up with a mail order pharmacy so no one has to venture out in bad weather to pick up medications.

    For caregivers- If you are a caregiver, please remember to check on your loved one frequently. Offer to shop for her or him and check on medications when the weather is very cold and snowy. Don’t wait for emergencies to develop a system to communicate. Everyone living alone should develop a "buddy system."

    Check the Car-Driving during the winter can be hazardous for anyone. But it is especially dangerous for older people. Have your car serviced before wintertime hits. Checking things like the oil, tires, battery and wipers can make a big difference on winter roads. Also make sure your CAA membership is up-to-date in case of emergencies.

     

     Keep Your Spirits High -At Queensview Retirement Community we understand how wintertime can restrict activities and opportunities to mingle with others. Avoid winter isolation and inquire about our “Winter Stay” program. Our suites are fully furnished, in the main building, ready and waiting for you to arrive. Why not visit us, or call us for details.

     

     

    VISIT, LIVE IT, LOVE IT  

    A visit, or a lunch are good ways to experience the community. Even better, try an overnight stay as this will enable you to connect with residents and talk with them about their experiences. Queensview Retirement Community offers independent, enhanced, short term and recuperative stays. We provide complimentary consultations, home visits and personalized orientations. We are here for you, please call us at 519 442 5621.

     

    Queensview Retirement Community,  70 King Edward Street, Paris , Ontario

    Queensviewrc.ca               

    ...



    Fire Safety and Senior Livingexpand

    FIRE SAFETY AND SENIORS

    Fire safety is a crucial issue for seniors who choose to live in their own home. Those caring for aging loved ones who wish to remain at home need to understand the fire risks and how to deal with them. The physical and mental impairments that tend to accompany aging tend to reduce older adults' reaction times and place them at a higher risk for causing fires, and thus at a higher risk of fire injury.

    Here are several tips for addressing senior fire safety.

    SMOKE DETECTORS

    Smoke detectors provide valuable protection. Detectors double your chance of surviving fire in your home by providing early warning and valuable time for escape. Ensure that your detector is loud enough to be heard by the senior living there.  Install smoke detectors and maintain them. If you cannot install a detector yourself, ask a relative, a friend, or a neighbor. They will help you locate the best spot for the detector and make sure that the detector is installed. There should be a detector on every level of your home or apartment.

    Do not disable your detectors by removing batteries or disconnecting wires. Doing so could mean the difference between life and death. Clean the detectors periodically to keep them free from dust and dirt. Test the batteries. Detectors connected to your house wiring should be tested regularly, too. Smoke detector batteries should be changed at least twice a year. Use your birthday or some other major holiday (beginend Daylight Savings Time) as your twice-annual "Battery Replacement Day."

    If your landlord or building management is responsible for smoke detectors where you live, call and ask when they last were tested, cleaned or replaced. If the detectors have not been attended to, insist that the party responsible act immediately. If they do not respond, call the Fire Department, your local Agency on Aging, or the Housing Authority.

    Smoke detectors are important protection to escape from a fire. You must have a smoke detector. Don't live without one!

    Smoking

    Whether or not you smoke, friends and relatives who visit your home may. It is important, in either case, to be careful with all smoking materials. Don't leave cigarettes, cigars or pipes unattended.  You must put out all smoking materials before you walk away.

    Don't put ashtrays on the arms of sofas or chairs. The ashtray can be tipped easily, spilling hot ashes or burning cigarettes onto the carpet or furniture.

    Use large ashtrays with wide lips. While smaller ashtrays may be more attractive, they are not safe. Cigarettes can roll of the edge, and ashes can easily be blown around.

    NEVER, EVER smoke in bed. Make it a rule not to allow any smoking materials in bedrooms. Burning sheets blankets and other bedclothes create a fire from which escape is impossible. Toxic fumes from the smoke can kill. If you begin to feel drowsy while watching television or reading, extinguish your cigarette or cigar. Do it before it may be too late.

    Kitchen Safety:

    If you must leave the kitchen while you are cooking, turn off the burner. If you have something in the oven, check it every 15 minutes or set the timer so that the buzzer will remind you to check the oven. Most kitchen fires occur because food is left unattended on the stove or in the oven. A "brief" departure from the kitchen to attend to other matters can easily turn into an extended time away. As a reminder to you, take a potholder, a cooking spoon, or other kitchen utensil with you when you leave the room. This object will help you remember that you have an unfinished task waiting in the kitchen. Never cook with loose, dangling sleeves. Robes and other loose fitting garments can ignite easily. This is a major cause of serious burns for senior citizens. Don't take chances!

    Electric:

    Regularly inspect your extension cords for fraying, exposed wires or loose plugs. They are not intended for use as permanent wiring. Unplug them when not in use. If you need to plug in two or three appliances, lamps, etc., do not use a simple extension cord. It is better to get an UL-approved unit that has built-in circuit breaker.

    Escape Plan

    There are three essential items that should be kept by your bedside: a telephone, whistle, and your eyeglasses. Always wear your security bracelet or necklace if you are currently living in a retirement community. You need your glasses to see how to escape from fire and avoid injury. The whistle serves two purposes: It lets people know where you are so that you can be rescued, and enables you to warn other family members of fire. Your first priority in fire is to get out of the building. Don't stop to call the Fire Department until you are safe outside. If you cannot escape by the door, telephoning allows you to call for help while attempting to escape by your back up route. If you use a wheel chair or walker, check all the exit routes in advance to be sure you can get through the doorways. If not, map out escape routes that are acceptable, and discuss your escape plans with your family, the building manager or neighbors. If you have impairments that might make it more difficult for you to escape from fire, consider talking to your Fire Department and letting them know your special circumstances in advance. Plan your escape route and practice getting out. It may seem foolish to do so, or unnecessary (of course you know how to find a front door), but when there is a fire or smoke, your reasoning and patterns may be affected by the emergency. If you have practiced escape routes, your memory and instinct will help you move in the right direction and in the right way. Check all the windows from which escape is planned. Can you open the window, or is it painted or nailed shut? Make sure your exits allow you to exit! Never use the elevator during a fire! Never leave apartment doors open if you flee a fire. Close the door behind you.

     

    Queensview is a welcoming retirement community that provides seniors with care, and peace of mind and your comfort and safety is important to us that is why we believe that good management of fire safety is essential to ensure that fires are unlikely to occur; that if they do occur they are likely to be controlled or contained quickly, effectively and safely. Here at Queensview our staff and residents are trained in fire safety.  Our fire system has sprinklers in all areas of the building, including stairwells, suites and common areas. Heat detectors are in place and we also have fire-monitoring company. Once a month fire drills are held, as your safety becomes our number one priority.

     

    VISIT , LIVE IT, LOVE IT to active and home

     

    A visit, a lunch are all good ways to experience the community. Even better, try an overnight stay as this will enable your parents to connect with residents and talk with them about their experiences.

    Queensview Retirement Community offers independent, enhanced, respite and convalescent care. We provide complimentary consultations, home visits and personalized orientations. We are here for you, please call us at 519 442 5621.

     

                   FIRE SAFETY AND SENIORS

    Fire safety is a crucial issue for seniors who choose to live in their own home. Those caring for aging loved ones who wish to remain at home need to understand the fire risks and how to deal with them. The physical and mental impairments that tend to accompany aging tend to reduce older adults' reaction times and place them at a higher risk for causing fires, and thus at a higher risk of fire injury.

    Here are several tips for addressing senior fire safety.

    SMOKE DETECTORS

    Smoke detectors provide valuable protection. Detectors double your chance of surviving fire in your home by providing early warning and valuable time for escape. Ensure that your detector is loud enough to be heard by the senior living there.  Install smoke detectors and maintain them. If you cannot install a detector yourself, ask a relative, a friend, or a neighbor. They will help you locate the best spot for the detector and make sure that the detector is installed. There should be a detector on every level of your home or apartment.

    Do not disable your detectors by removing batteries or disconnecting wires. Doing so could mean the difference between life and death. Clean the detectors periodically to keep them free from dust and dirt. Test the batteries. Detectors connected to your house wiring should be tested regularly, too. Smoke detector batteries should be changed at least twice a year. Use your birthday or some other major holiday (beginend Daylight Savings Time) as your twice-annual "Battery Replacement Day."

    If your landlord or building management is responsible for smoke detectors where you live, call and ask when they last were tested, cleaned or replaced. If the detectors have not been attended to, insist that the party responsible act immediately. If they do not respond, call the Fire Department, your local Agency on Aging, or the Housing Authority.

    Smoke detectors are important protection to escape from a fire. You must have a smoke detector. Don't live without one!

    Smoking

    Whether or not you smoke, friends and relatives who visit your home may. It is important, in either case, to be careful with all smoking materials. Don't leave cigarettes, cigars or pipes unattended.  You must put out all smoking materials before you walk away.

    Don't put ashtrays on the arms of sofas or chairs. The ashtray can be tipped easily, spilling hot ashes or burning cigarettes onto the carpet or furniture.

    Use large ashtrays with wide lips. While smaller ashtrays may be more attractive, they are not safe. Cigarettes can roll of the edge, and ashes can easily be blown around.

    NEVER, EVER smoke in bed. Make it a rule not to allow any smoking materials in bedrooms. Burning sheets blankets and other bedclothes create a fire from which escape is impossible. Toxic fumes from the smoke can kill. If you begin to feel drowsy while watching television or reading, extinguish your cigarette or cigar. Do it before it may be too late.

    Kitchen Safety:

    If you must leave the kitchen while you are cooking, turn off the burner. If you have something in the oven, check it every 15 minutes or set the timer so that the buzzer will remind you to check the oven. Most kitchen fires occur because food is left unattended on the stove or in the oven. A "brief" departure from the kitchen to attend to other matters can easily turn into an extended time away. As a reminder to you, take a potholder, a cooking spoon, or other kitchen utensil with you when you leave the room. This object will help you remember that you have an unfinished task waiting in the kitchen. Never cook with loose, dangling sleeves. Robes and other loose fitting garments can ignite easily. This is a major cause of serious burns for senior citizens. Don't take chances!

    Electric:

    Regularly inspect your extension cords for fraying, exposed wires or loose plugs. They are not intended for use as permanent wiring. Unplug them when not in use. If you need to plug in two or three appliances, lamps, etc., do not use a simple extension cord. It is better to get an UL-approved unit that has built-in circuit breaker.

    Escape Plan

    There are three essential items that should be kept by your bedside: a telephone, whistle, and your eyeglasses. Always wear your security bracelet or necklace if you are currently living in a retirement community. You need your glasses to see how to escape from fire and avoid injury. The whistle serves two purposes: It lets people know where you are so that you can be rescued, and enables you to warn other family members of fire. Your first priority in fire is to get out of the building. Don't stop to call the Fire Department until you are safe outside. If you cannot escape by the door, telephoning allows you to call for help while attempting to escape by your back up route. If you use a wheel chair or walker, check all the exit routes in advance to be sure you can get through the doorways. If not, map out escape routes that are acceptable, and discuss your escape plans with your family, the building manager or neighbors. If you have impairments that might make it more difficult for you to escape from fire, consider talking to your Fire Department and letting them know your special circumstances in advance. Plan your escape route and practice getting out. It may seem foolish to do so, or unnecessary (of course you know how to find a front door), but when there is a fire or smoke, your reasoning and patterns may be affected by the emergency. If you have practiced escape routes, your memory and instinct will help you move in the right direction and in the right way. Check all the windows from which escape is planned. Can you open the window, or is it painted or nailed shut? Make sure your exits allow you to exit! Never use the elevator during a fire! Never leave apartment doors open if you flee a fire. Close the door behind you.

     

    Queensview is a welcoming retirement community that provides seniors with care, and peace of mind and your comfort and safety is important to us that is why we believe that good management of fire safety is essential to ensure that fires are unlikely to occur; that if they do occur they are likely to be controlled or contained quickly, effectively and safely. Here at Queensview our staff and residents are trained in fire safety.  Our fire system has sprinklers in all areas of the building, including stairwells, suites and common areas. Heat detectors are in place and we also have fire-monitoring company. Once a month fire drills are held, as your safety becomes our number one priority.

     

    VISIT , LIVE IT, LOVE IT to active and home

     

    A visit, a lunch are all good ways to experience the community. Even better, try an overnight stay as this will enable your parents to connect with residents and talk with them about their experiences.

    Queensview Retirement Community offers independent, enhanced, respite and convalescent care. We provide complimentary consultations, home visits and personalized orientations. We are here for you, please call us at 519 442 5621.

     

                  

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    Queensview offers resort-like living in a small town setting. When you first walk into this retirement community, you feel like you are walking into a resort hotel. That feeling never really ends for residents, where you live in brightly lit, well-appointed, spacious suites, and staff are at the ready to take care of your needs. Care on hand includes laundry and housekeeping, up to nursing and support from personal support workers (PSWs).

    Daily activities here include bingo, card games, arts and crafts, gardening, movie nights, and more. This home offers month to month leases. Short term stays and convalescent care stays are also available.

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