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Harbour Hill Retirement Community
Harbour Hill Retirement Community
104 Suncoast Drive East
Goderich, Ontario, N7A 0A7
Harbour Hill Retirement Community
 

Harbour Hill Retirement Community

104 Suncoast Drive East, Goderich, Ontario, N7A 0A7

Cost (from):
$2,500 per month
Capacity:
76
Total Suites:
64
Overnight Care Staff:
2

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Harbour Hill Retirement Community

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Harbour Hill Retirement Community

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Harbour Hill Retirement Community

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Contact Name:
Stephanie Hartwick or Shelly Rodgers

Phone Number:



Address:
104 Suncoast Drive East, Goderich, Ontario, N7A 0A7
about this community

About this community:

Harbour Hill offers 1-2 bedroom suites equipped with kitchenettes and balcony. Monthly rental includes all meals, snacks, weekly housekeeping, laundering of towels & linens, emergency response system, 24 hour RPN & PSW staffing. Enjoy scheduled exercise classes along with robust activities and private transportation. The Spa Building features a nail bar, Salon & therapeutic tub. Care and pricing can be customized to meet your changing needs. We offer permanent, short term and recuperative stays.

Year Founded: 2014
Ownership Type: profit
Languages Spoken: English, French

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Level of Care

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community


Health Services:

  • Vitals monitoring (with no special assistance)
  • Ostomy care (with special assistance)
  • Catheter care (with special assistance)
  • Cognitively impaired residents (with special assistance)
  • Physically challenged residents (with special assistance)
  • Oxygen assistance (with no special assistance)
  • Medication by pen (with special assistance)
  • Chart by exception (with no special assistance)

Care options available:

  • Respite care available
  • Private home-care allowed
  • Palliative care available
  • Convalescent care
 Independent Living

We are an all inclusive community offering two levels of care: independent and enhanced. Please call Stephanie Hartwick or Shelly Rogers for further details : 519 440- 0110

Details
Cost from$2,500
Designated dining areaYes
MealsIncluded (3x/day )
Daily tidyExtra fee
HousekeepingIncluded (1x/week )
Bathing assistanceExtra fee
Medication administrationExtra fee

 Assisted Living

We use nurses and personal support workers, all care is customized. We offer independent and enhanced care only. Please call Stephanie Hartwick or Shelly Rogers for more details 519 440 0110

Details
Cost from$3,092
Designated dining areaYes
Cancer careExtra fee
DiabetesExtra fee
DialysisExtra fee
Huntington's DiseaseExtra fee
Multiple SclerosisExtra fee
Stroke careExtra fee
MealsIncluded (3x/day )
Daily tidyExtra fee
HousekeepingIncluded (1x/week )
Bathing assistanceExtra fee
Dressing assistanceExtra fee
Transfer assistanceIncluded
Incontinence careExtra fee
Medication administrationExtra fee
Resident RemindersIncluded


Amenities & Services

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details

Residence Amenities & Services

  • Arts and crafts
  • Emergency call system (pendent)
  • Games Room
  • Hairdresser
  • Laundry machines
  • Library
  • Mail box
  • Newspapers delivered to concierge
  • Onsite foot care
  • Parking (outdoor)
  • Party room
  • Patio/Courtyard/BBQ
  • Pet friendly
  • Private bus for outings, regular trips
  • Private dining room for family/friends
  • Recreation facilities onsite
  • Religious Services & Holiday Celebrations
  • Spa tub or shower room
  • Spa/Beauty Salon
  • Wellness Center
  • Wheelchair (scooter)
  • Wheelchair Accessible


Programs & Activities

  • Arts and Crafts
  • Brain Fitness
  • Card Games
  • Entertainment
  • Excursions
  • Exercise Program
  • Movie Nights
  • Parties
  • Volunteering
  • Weekly Shopping Trips & Excursions


Dining

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dining

Our meals are prepared onsite and are fresh daily. We will do room service if the resident falls ill and cannot come down to the dining room. We are open to discuss and prepare specific food requests, and will accommodate as long as we are able.


Meal Service

  • Bistro: Resident & family (24 hours)
  • Room Service (extra fee)
  • Table service
  • Tray service in suite (included)

Seating Type

  • Open seating

Special Diets

  • Diabetic
  • Gluten Free
  • Low sodium
  • Vegetarian

Staffing

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staffing

Number of care staff:

  • Daytime: 3
  • Weekends: 3
  • Nights: 2
Medical Staff
Registered Practical Nurses24 hrs/day
Personal Support Workers24 hrs/day
DoctorNot available
DentistNot available
PhysiotherapistNot available
ChiropodistVisiting 1 day/month

Suites

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suite
TypeOwnershipCost/mth fromSizeCompanion feeAmenitiesContact
1-bedroomRent$2,500 - $3,504477sq/ft+$676
  • Cable TV in room (additional fee)
  • Call Bell System
  • Kitchenette
  • Mini-fridge
  • Patio/Balcony
  • Personal phone number in room (additional Fee)
email
2-bedroomRent$3,994 - $4,274626sq/ft+$676
  • Cable TV in room (additional fee)
  • Call Bell System
  • Kitchenette
  • Mini-fridge
  • Patio/Balcony
  • Personal phone number in room (additional Fee)
email
  • Type:
  • Ownership: Rent
  • Cost: $2,500
  • Size: 477sq/ft
  • Cost mth/from: +$676
  • Details:
    • Cable TV in room (additional fee)
    • Call Bell System
    • Kitchenette
    • Mini-fridge
    • Patio/Balcony
    • Personal phone number in room (additional Fee)
  • Contact: email

  • Type:
  • Ownership: Rent
  • Cost: $3,994
  • Size: 626sq/ft
  • Cost mth/from: +$676
  • Details:
    • Cable TV in room (additional fee)
    • Call Bell System
    • Kitchenette
    • Mini-fridge
    • Patio/Balcony
    • Personal phone number in room (additional Fee)
  • Contact: email


  • Neighbourhood

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    neighbourhood

    Goderich has been voted the "prettiest town in Canada" and is on the shores of Lake Huron. Surrounded by lush and plentiful fields, rivers and streams. It has also been awarded the prestigious "Bloom Award" for multiple years. Harbour Hill is located close to the YMCA, coffee shops, stores and is easily accessible from all roads into the Community.

    Nearby:


    Move-in Requirements

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    admission

    We will have a personal interview and discuss your health with you. If additional information is required, we will decide at that time. Each persons' health assessment will lead to a customized care package.

    • Chest x-ray
    • Personal Interview
    • TB test required

    Stories & Testimonials

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    stories

    The Importance of a Daily Routineexpand

    The Importance of Routine for the Older Adult Whether we like it or not most of us are creatures of habit.  When we were younger, we liked the spontaneity in a situation, however as we age we like less excitement and more routine.

    Why is that?  Most of us are afraid of the unknown, the loss of control, losing our memory or independence.  Routine makes us less anxious, feeling more secure and actually we do sleep better.

    In becoming more forgetful when we age, there is a natural fear that our lives or health may be put at risk.  Forgetting to turn off the stove or not taking medications are good examples; however, having routines might help.

    Putting a timer on when cooking will help remind of an item on the stove, while taking medications with meals, will help establish and maintain a routine.

    Routines also help those with dementia. Daily rituals or routines are beneficial because the task becomes ingrained into memory without conscious thought.  Eating and getting dressed are great examples because it is something the older adult has been doing all their life.  When faced with something new, people with dementia may act out, become angry or uncooperative. We have seen this happen when their prescriptions are placed in a different area than they are used to.

    Although routine is necessary and important with the older senior adult, it’s equally important to make sure they exercise a certain amount of control and decision making in their own lives, whether it be what they would like to eat or when they would like to go to sleep. This independence will afford them a better and more fulfilling life.

    VISIT, LIVE IT, LOVE IT

    A visit, a lunch and a personalized tour are all great ways to experience Harbour Hill.  Even better, take advantage of a trial stay to truly

    experience the ambiance of community living.   Enjoy the events of the day

    and take advantage of daily outings in the Harbour Hill bus.

    We are always available for complimentary consultations, home visits and personalized orientations.

     

    ...



    The Importance of a Daily Routineexpand

    The Importance of Routine for the Older Adult Whether we like it or not most of us are creatures of habit.  When we were younger, we liked the spontaneity in a situation, however as we age we like less excitement and more routine.

    Why is that?  Most of us are afraid of the unknown, the loss of control, losing our memory or independence.  Routine makes us less anxious, feeling more secure and actually we do sleep better.

    In becoming more forgetful when we age, there is a natural fear that our lives or health may be put at risk.  Forgetting to turn off the stove or not taking medications are good examples; however, having routines might help.

    Putting a timer on when cooking will help remind of an item on the stove, while taking medications with meals, will help establish and maintain a routine.

    Routines also help those with dementia. Daily rituals or routines are beneficial because the task becomes ingrained into memory without conscious thought.  Eating and getting dressed are great examples because it is something the older adult has been doing all their life.  When faced with something new, people with dementia may act out, become angry or uncooperative. We have seen this happen when their prescriptions are placed in a different area than they are used to.

    Although routine is necessary and important with the older senior adult, it’s equally important to make sure they exercise a certain amount of control and decision making in their own lives, whether it be what they would like to eat or when they would like to go to sleep. This independence will afford them a better and more fulfilling life.

    VISIT, LIVE IT, LOVE IT

    A visit, a lunch and a personalized tour are all great ways to experience Harbour Hill.  Even better, take advantage of a trial stay to truly

    experience the ambiance of community living.   Enjoy the events of the day

    and take advantage of daily outings in the Harbour Hill bus.

    We are always available for complimentary consultations, home visits and personalized orientations.

     

    ...



    How to know when it is time to stop driving?expand

    How to Know when it is time to stop driving 

    For most of us driving is a necessity - especially when we live in rural communities where public transportation is not available.

    Our seniors have expressed their angst is how they will get their weekly groceries, attend appointments or need to rely on others.  It is another loss at the time of life when there may have been other losses and once again, they realize, they are losing their independence.

    The prevailing question should always be, “am I jeopardizing my safety or someone else’s when I’m behind the wheel”? If the answer is yes, then it’s likely time to face the facts and stop driving.

    Health conditions such as memory loss and Parkinson’s can affect a driver’s judgement and ability to react.  Vision Impairment clouds the ability to see others on the road, or check the speedometer for speed.  Impaired hearing undermines the ability to hear traffic noises such as screeching tires, trains, sirens and other driver horns.  Medications may compromise the ability to drive through blurred vision, drowsiness or other side effects.  Abusing alcohol is always a dangerous situation, however adding age into the equation is a disaster that is preventable. 

    Increased amounts of dings and scratches on the vehicle, are also good indicators that your depth perception is changing and complaints about night time driving and increased traffic tickets may be hints that closer observation is required.

    There are benefits of not driving.  Initially the emotions of losing the ability to drive may have one feeling the loss of independence.  Feeling angry or frustrated are normal emotions but it is important to recognize that it takes a lot of courage to stop driving. 

    Saving on car insurance, gas, car ownership will outweigh the cost of taking a taxi or hiring someone to drive. Giving up your license may offer some health benefits as well.   Walking when possible will also boost energy and help you sleep better. 

    Alternatives to driving exist in every community, whether it be calling a taxi, a good neighbour or a family member . Look into community transit provided by service clubs or a transportation service shared by Community Support agencies.  Whatever the choice, knowing that you have made the decision yourself will make you feel better than having someone else make the decision for you, and you will arrive safely at your destination.

    ...



    How to know when it is time to stop driving?expand

    How to Know when it is time to stop driving 

    For most of us driving is a necessity - especially when we live in rural communities where public transportation is not available.

    Our seniors have expressed their angst is how they will get their weekly groceries, attend appointments or need to rely on others.  It is another loss at the time of life when there may have been other losses and once again, they realize, they are losing their independence.

    The prevailing question should always be, “am I jeopardizing my safety or someone else’s when I’m behind the wheel”? If the answer is yes, then it’s likely time to face the facts and stop driving.

    Health conditions such as memory loss and Parkinson’s can affect a driver’s judgement and ability to react.  Vision Impairment clouds the ability to see others on the road, or check the speedometer for speed.  Impaired hearing undermines the ability to hear traffic noises such as screeching tires, trains, sirens and other driver horns.  Medications may compromise the ability to drive through blurred vision, drowsiness or other side effects.  Abusing alcohol is always a dangerous situation, however adding age into the equation is a disaster that is preventable. 

    Increased amounts of dings and scratches on the vehicle, are also good indicators that your depth perception is changing and complaints about night time driving and increased traffic tickets may be hints that closer observation is required.

    There are benefits of not driving.  Initially the emotions of losing the ability to drive may have one feeling the loss of independence.  Feeling angry or frustrated are normal emotions but it is important to recognize that it takes a lot of courage to stop driving. 

    Saving on car insurance, gas, car ownership will outweigh the cost of taking a taxi or hiring someone to drive. Giving up your license may offer some health benefits as well.   Walking when possible will also boost energy and help you sleep better. 

    Alternatives to driving exist in every community, whether it be calling a taxi, a good neighbour or a family member . Look into community transit provided by service clubs or a transportation service shared by Community Support agencies.  Whatever the choice, knowing that you have made the decision yourself will make you feel better than having someone else make the decision for you, and you will arrive safely at your destination.

    VISIT, LIVE IT, LOVE IT

    ...



    Safe Senior Travelling Tipsexpand

    Safe Senior Travel Tips

    Travelling in our senior years can be interesting and fun, while enriching our lives with new experiences.

    Often we hear seniors say “I don’t travel anymore, now I need some help getting around”. Don’t let minor disabilities and special needs deter you from travelling. Most places can meet your needs, and are accommodating. Whether you need oxygen, a walker, a wheelchair or assistance from another person, travel can continue to be something enjoyable with a little extra planning. 

    When planning to travel call or research on-line, hotels or bed and breakfasts that may meet your needs.  Ask for rooms closer on the ground floor, if distance walking or stairs are a concern.  Inquire whether they have wheelchair accessible rooms, and whether there is staff available to transport luggage to your room. 

    Ensure medications, medical supplies, personal identification and health card are traveling with you, and take an extra weeks supply or a prescription, in the event of lost medications or travel delays.
    Traveling with Oxygen may mean bringing an additional container or investigating where Oxygen may be obtained on route.

    If you require a wheelchair and don’t want to bring your own, find out where you can rent one for the duration of the trip, or if the hotel has any available to rent.

    Wear comfortable clothes and flat shoes. Pack an umbrella, hat and sunglasses for the hazy hot days of summer, and always have a charged cell phone with you for emergencies.

    Enjoy your trip, take many pictures, and create memories to last a lifetime.

    VISIT, LIVE IT, LOVE IT

    A visit, a lunch and a personalized tour are all great ways to experience Harbour Hill.  Even better, take advantage of a trial stay to truly experience the ambiance of community living.   Enjoy the events of the day and take advantage of daily outings on the Harbour Hill bus. 

    Harbour Hill Retirement Community offers independent, enhanced, respite and convalescent stays.  We provide complimentary consultations, home visits and personalized orientations.  

    ...



    Are you getting enough fluids?expand

    Are you getting enough fluids?

    Most seniors do not take in enough fluids to keep themselves hydrated.  Dehydration is a common issue with seniors.  Although dehydration is often associated with inadequate fluid intake, it can also be caused by sweating, blood loss, diarrhea, taking fluid pills, or diabetes.

    As we age we also do not feel thirst as we once did, hence we consume less water and are more prone to becoming dehydrated.  If left untreated one may require hospitalization or even die.

    So what do we need to watch for?     

    Some of the mild symptoms to watch out for may include dry mouth, passing small amounts of dark yellow urine, cramping in lower legs, headaches, irritability, sleeplessness or generally just not feeling well.

    More severe symptoms include low blood pressure, convulsions, stomach and lower limb cramping, bloated stomach, dry or sunken eyes with no tears, rapid but weak pulse, wrinkled skin, or breathing faster than normal. 

    Older adults who drink enough water will tend to be less constipated, have less falls and reduce the risk for certain cancers.    Drinking water also reduces the risk of fatal coronary heart disease.

    How to increase intake of fluids?

    Adding juices and milk to your meals is a great way to increase intake.  If concerned about calories adding water with lemon may be an alternative.  Experiment with different temperatures of liquids-warm up juices or milk if needed.  Enjoying some warm hot broth soup on a cold day or a popsicle on a hot day is another option.  For older adults that may resist drinking fluids, smoothies or milkshakes may be of interest. 

    A couple of useful tips:

    Reduce beverages with caffeine as they force the kidneys to excrete more liquids. 

    Try the pinch test.   In pinching your skin, if your skin is sluggish you may be dehydrated and may need to try adding some fluids to your day. 

    Considering gradual changes, drink more fluids for a healthier life. 

    VISIT, LIVE IT, LOVE IT 

    A visit, a lunch and a personalized tour are all great ways to experience Harbour Hill.  Even better, experience a trial stay to truly experience the ambiance of community living.   Connect up with a resident and ask them about their experiences also. 

    Harbour Hill Retirement Community offers independent, enhanced, respite and convalescent stays.  We provide complimentary consultations, home visits and personalized orientations.  

    ...



    Celebrate the Grand Opening of "The Link" , at Harbout Hill Retirement Communityexpand

    The Grand Opening of the Link addition at Harbour Hill Retirement Community is May 12th from 2-4pm.

    The new link provides another 4000 plus square feet for the residents of Harbour Hill and will further provide hair services, registered massage therapy and manicure services to the community at large.

    The first floor addition adds a common room, therapeutic tub and massage therapy area for the residents. This nows gives the community more space for gatherings, games, television. 

    The second floor addition contains a kitchen, enhanced living dining room, and a common area with large windows to enjoy some quiet time with friends or the amazing sunsets! 

    Please join us to celebrate the official opening, May 12, 2-4pm, and enjoy homemade taste from our kitchen, entertainment and good company!

    RSVP, by May 9th, 519 440 0110 

     

     

     

    ...



    Hanging on to Clutterexpand

    Many of us have had the experience of going into an older adults’ home to find clutter and an over- abundance of items they no longer use.  Hanging on to items for sentimental reasons, or thinking that they may need an item at a later date may be partially a reason that decluttering has not occurred. 

    Having clutter may increase the risk of falls, lead to unsanitary conditions or even make it difficult for paramedics to reach you in an emergency. 

    Cluttering is when people hang on to too many items they no longer need.  It can be too much furniture in a room or food items that are kept past their expiration date.   Both can lead to health and safety issues for the older adult living at home. 

    Many hold on to items they acquired, thinking there is value, potential future use, or that their children will want it, to find that most items are not desired or of any value.  Children often worry about the parent’s safety and frame of mind when parents are not willing to let items go. 

    The older adult may be embarrassed to have others visit, fearing judgement for the amount of clutter, or the fact that someone may need to move a pile of items in order to sit down.  Making a cup of tea for their guest with clutter in the kitchen may also leave them feeling uncomfortable.  Clutter in the kitchen can result in spoiled foods which may lead to food borne illnesses. 

    So what can be done? 

    Consider whether clutter has always been a part of the older adults’ life or whether they have entered a new phase.   If clutter has always existed, explaining your concerns may be a first step to help declutter.  Find out what they are willing to part with, and help them remove the additional items little by little.  Every small step is another step to a safer environment. 

    If the older adult is overwhelmed by the amount of items they possess, get them involved in what they wish to keep and what they wish to part with.  Tackle one room at a time.  While their physical limitations may not allow them to assist, their ability to be part of the change will be beneficial to all involved. 

    In the event clutter may be a new concern, consider whether they are suffering from dementia, or depression.  A trip to their physician may determine if there are medical issues surrounding the issue and allow for taking necessary steps to deal with the issue.

    Freedom from clutter is a mood booster.  Everyone feels better when the task is completed and the older adult is safe in their own space.  

    ...



    Making Memories with your Familyexpand

    As General Manager of Harbour Hill Retirement Community, and over 25 years of experience, I’m happy to help with any questions you may have with regard to living a good life in retirement. Email me your inquiries on retirement living: [email protected]

    MAKING FAMILY MEMORIES

    During this holiday season it is a great time to take steps to preserve your family's memories because if your family doesn't have a storyteller, family history could eventually disappear. These ideas may help inspire you to make memories and help your parents leave a legacy for the generations to come.

    Gather Those Family Photos

    Those shoeboxes full of disorganized photos, stacks of dusty photo albums, and slides no one has looked at for years are a treasure chest of memories waiting to spring back to life by digitally scanning old prints and then save them onto CDs or DVDs or an external hard drive to make a digital scrapbook.

    Get Your Pen Ready

    Listening to seniors re-tell their stories of old, but we now need to start captioning those stories by, life writing activities. These may be done individually or at family gatherings. In group activities, members are encouraged to prepare, in advance, information about family relationships, life accomplishments, school, work and major life. Recording or transcribing your talks will create documentation of their life that will be a priceless resource to you after they are gone and to many relatives that will come after them.

    Collect Family Recipes

    Many families strengthen their bond and maintain their identity by passing on recipes from generation to generation. A recipe book can be one of the most powerful ways to leave a legacy because it takes us back to the table, or kitchen where it all began; where the childhood memories started. Encourage the younger children to voice which dishes, or baking, they love the best. In collecting all of our family’s recipes in one place, we are creating a treasure for many generations to enjoy, no matter where they are living and the connection it creates is a strong one.

    Create a Memory Treasure Chest

     A memory treasure chest box should reflect the interests or a moment in history that has meaning to the individual and future generations. The box should be large enough to accommodate meaningful items from the past such as jewelry, toys, family pictures, memorabilia from a trip, ribbons, buttons, cards, drawings, old love letters, poems, your corsage or boutonniere from your high school prom, a playbill from the first date with your spouse. Involving your family as much as possible will make your presence in their memories even stronger.

    At Harbour Hill , we are part of your memory treasure chest and we know it is essential that family and friends are able to not only remember your life, but also celebrate it. Our daily activities are designed to bring out the best in life, and we invite family to share their lives with each other and our residents,to add more living in retirement.

    VISIT, LIVE IT, LOVE IT  

    A visit, or a lunch are good ways to experience the community. Even better, try an overnight stay as this will enable you to connect with residents and talk with them about their experiences. Harbour Hill Retirement Community offers independent, enhanced, short term and recuperative stays. We provide complimentary consultations, home visits and personalized orientations. We are here for you, please call us at 519 440 0110

    Harbourhillsuites.com

     

     

     

     

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    Preparing for Wintertime Challengesexpand

    Preparing for Wintertime Challenges

    Vida Proctor, is the General Manager at Harbour Hill and has over 25 years in the elder care sector. We are here to help, please email your questions to her, [email protected]

    Chilling temperatures and treacherous winter conditions can often be a challenge during the winter months.  Even simple things like going to the grocery store or picking up mail become a concern.  Here are a few things to keep in mind to help seniors safe during the cold and snowy season:

    Ice and snow-Sidewalks covered with snow or ice can pose a serious risk for seniors.  Make sure that porches, driveways and sidewalks are clear of snow and ice.  Add sand or salt to the surface to reduce the potential for falls. Hire an outside service to clean heavy snowed areas to reduce heavy pushing or lifting.  Wearing proper sized footwear with tread is necessary.  If using a cane, it is advisable to have new winter picks for support. 

    Dress for Warmth-Cold temperatures can lead to frostbite and hypothermia (a condition where the body temperature dips too low). Wearing layers of clothing helps regulate body temperature both inside and out. In very cold temperatures, cover all exposed skin. Use a scarf to cover your mouth and protect your lungs.

    Disaster kit-Winter storms can be fierce enough to knock down power lines, confining seniors to their homes. It is essential to make sure homes are equipped with a disaster kit.  Stock up the cupboard with a week’s supply of non-perishable food and drinking water.  Having a hand-operated can opener to use during power outages is helpful. Make sure there is a flashlight in the home with back up batteries.

    Fill prescriptions of critical medications-Don’t let important medications run low during the winter.  Switch your senior’s prescriptions to a local pharmacy that makes home deliveries or sign up with a mail order pharmacy so no one has to venture out in bad weather to pick up medications.

    For caregivers- Check on your loved one frequently. Offer to shop for them and check on medications when the weather is very cold and snowy. Don’t wait for emergencies to develop a system to communicate. Call on a neighbor to physically check on you loved one if distance is an issue.

    Check the Car-Driving during the winter can be hazardous for anyone, but it can be especially dangerous for older adults. Have your car serviced before the snowy cold weather comes. Checking things like the oil, tires, battery and wipers can make a big difference on winter roads. Also make sure your CAA membership is up-to-date in case of emergencies.

    Keep Your Spirits High -At Harbour Hill Retirement Community we understand how wintertime can be difficult for seniors.  Reduced activity and opportunity to mingle with others can lead to depression. Beat the winter blues and inquire about our “Winter Stay” program.  No snow or groceries to worry about, your medications will be ordered for you and an emergency response system is available in each fully furnished suite. 

    VISIT, LIVE IT, LOVE IT 

    A visit and a lunch, are all great ways to experience Harbour Hill.  Even better, experience a trial stay to truly experience the ambiance of community living,giving you a chance to connect with the residents.

    Harbour Hill Retirement Community offers independent, enhanced, respite and convalescent stays.  We provide complimentary consultations, home visits and personalized orientations

    ...



    Exercise ,the Key to Healthy Agingexpand

    Exercise, the Key to Healthy Aging

     

    As we grow older, we often find ourselves making excuses as to why we do not exercise.  We tell ourselves that exercise is boring, we are in too much pain, we fear we may injure ourselves or that we are too old to start. Often these are messages bear little value and hold us back to a healthier, and more fulfilling independent life. 

    If  your goal is to remain as independent as possible as you age, an active lifestyle is more important than ever.  Exercise can manage symptoms of pain, maintain independence and boost energy.  It is not only good for the body but also good our mind and soul.  Exercise can improve your overall sense of well-being, improve your mood and manage pain.

    Exercise like walking, swimming, yoga, and group exercise with others can be fun.   It does not have to mean a trip to the gym or doing strenuous exercise.  Simply, exercise means putting more movement in your day, whether you are housebound or able to attend group activities.          

    Benefits of Keeping Active

    As we age, our metabolism slows down, often adding additional unwanted pounds.  By exercising we are able to build muscles that burn more calories, sleep better and improve overall health.  Exercise reduces chronic condition symptoms, by improving heart health, blood pressure, digestive function and bone density.  It improves balance, coordination and reduces the risk for falls. 

    For those that have never exercised or realize that starting a daily exercise program will be of benefit, the first question may be, “Where do I start”?   It is always a good idea to see your health care provider before starting any exercise program.  Start slow and commit yourself to a certain amount of time each day.  Set short term goals, whether it be to sleep better, or increase energy levels.  Listen to your body, and be realistic in your expectations at the start. It is better to do something everyday, rather than over exerting yourself one day and, as a result, are unable to exercise for two days after that.  Soon the short term goals will assist in achieving the larger goals that may be main reason for exercising. 

    Even the frail adult that is chair bound may have the ability to participate in exercise by using free weights such as dumbbells, resistant bands or by participating in chair yoga. 

    Some of the types of exercises that are beneficial to us as we age are: walking, fitness classes, gentle water aerobics, yoga and a simple bouncing a ball between friends. General fitness classes are available through the local community centre and most retirement communities, including Harbour Hill hold daily activities, to keep the residents moving and therefore more independent.

    To assist in enjoying activities as you exercise one can: listen to music, window shop, take pictures, chat with friends, or enjoy a pet.  Each activity can be done while walking at a pace suited for you.  

    If you are one that dreads exercise, get active with a friend,  stay committed and you will find that you will feel better and have a different outlook and find that with time will actually enjoy the exercise.  Regular exercise builds strength and stamina, prevents loss of bone mass and improves balance, reducing risks of falls.  Get support of others and exercise safely.Try a yoga class by calling Harbour Hill today and see how a group activity can benefit you.  Visit, Live it, Love itExercise, the Key to Healthy Aging

     

    As we grow older, we often find ourselves making excuses as to why we do not exercise.  We tell ourselves that exercise is boring, we are in too much pain, we fear we may injure ourselves or that we are too old to start. Often these are messages bear little value and hold us back to a healthier, and more fulfilling independent life. 

    If  your goal is to remain as independent as possible as you age, an active lifestyle is more important than ever.  Exercise can manage symptoms of pain, maintain independence and boost energy.  It is not only good for the body but also good our mind and soul.  Exercise can improve your overall sense of well-being, improve your mood and manage pain.

    Exercise like walking, swimming, yoga, and group exercise with others can be fun.   It does not have to mean a trip to the gym or doing strenuous exercise.  Simply, exercise means putting more movement in your day, whether you are housebound or able to attend group activities.          

    Benefits of Keeping Active

    As we age, our metabolism slows down, often adding additional unwanted pounds.  By exercising we are able to build muscles that burn more calories, sleep better and improve overall health.  Exercise reduces chronic condition symptoms, by improving heart health, blood pressure, digestive function and bone density.  It improves balance, coordination and reduces the risk for falls. 

    For those that have never exercised or realize that starting a daily exercise program will be of benefit, the first question may be, “Where do I start”?   It is always a good idea to see your health care provider before starting any exercise program.  Start slow and commit yourself to a certain amount of time each day.  Set short term goals, whether it be to sleep better, or increase energy levels.  Listen to your body, and be realistic in your expectations at the start. It is better to do something everyday, rather than over exerting yourself one day and, as a result, are unable to exercise for two days after that.  Soon the short term goals will assist in achieving the larger goals that may be main reason for exercising. 

    Even the frail adult that is chair bound may have the ability to participate in exercise by using free weights such as dumbbells, resistant bands or by participating in chair yoga. 

    Some of the types of exercises that are beneficial to us as we age are: walking, fitness classes, gentle water aerobics, yoga and a simple bouncing a ball between friends. General fitness classes are available through the local community centre and most retirement communities, including Harbour Hill hold daily activities, to keep the residents moving and therefore more independent.

    To assist in enjoying activities as you exercise one can: listen to music, window shop, take pictures, chat with friends, or enjoy a pet.  Each activity can be done while walking at a pace suited for you.  

    If you are one that dreads exercise, get active with a friend,  stay committed and you will find that you will feel better and have a different outlook and find that with time will actually enjoy the exercise.  Regular exercise builds strength and stamina, prevents loss of bone mass and improves balance, reducing risks of falls.  Get support of others and exercise safely.Try a yoga class by calling Harbour Hill today and see how a group activity can benefit you.  Visit, Live it, Love it 519 440-0110

    ...



    Shirley's Story : A Resident of Harbour Hill Enjoys Living Lifeexpand

    Shirley’s Story

    What is it really like to live in a retirement community?  While in my recent articles, I have concentrated on the when, why, and affordability of a retirement community, this week, the article will be slightly different.  In speaking to older adults residing in retirement communities, it soon became apparent that a resident perspective would be beneficial.  It did not take me long to find someone who was willing to share their experience.  Here is Shirley’s story!

    “Recently I moved to Harbour Hill Retirement Community.  While it meant many changes for me, they were positive ones.  My life has been simplified, without the stress of maintaining a home.  Now I have no concerns about upkeep, grass cutting, snow removal, grocery shopping or lugging in the parcels. 

    I spent a lot of time alone in my home and while I do have my own unit and my privacy , I also have the opportunity to socialize, if I chose to, on a daily basis.  Although my family and friends continue to stop by, I now visit with them, instead of them worrying about what needed to be done and asking them to help.

    I can’t say enough about the caring staff who are always ready to offer help and comfort if I need or want it.  If I have questions or feel ill, staff are immediately available to assist me.  My family no longer worries about me being alone.  The meals are always good and always give me a couple of choices.  Snacks and drinks are available between meals.  I can invite friends and family for a meal and not need to worry about cooking it.  There are activities to take part in, as I wish- Euchre, bridge, Wii bowling, Yoga, entertainment, and happy hour to name a few.   Weather permitting we can enjoy lemonade or ice cream on the patio.  The bus is available to take me shopping, to appointments or on special outings.  No longer do I worry about car maintenance, insurance, driving in inclement weather or asking others to take me where I needed to go. 

    I can sit on my balcony and watch the sunrise or visit with a friend and watch the sunset.  I feel blessed to be living here for this stage of my journey.  Simplifying my life has been the best decision I have made.”

    Often older adults often spend countless hours wondering whether they can continue to live alone, and contemplating what it would be like if they moved.   Taking the first steps is the most difficult decision, but once the made, I have often heard “I wish I would have made the move sooner”. 

    Harbour Hill Retirement Community, is an all-inclusive community. All meals, snacks, beverages, suite laundry, weekly  housekeeping, 24 hour response system, daily activities and private transportation are included in our monthly fee. We offer independent and enhanced care managed by nurses and personal support workers, in a brand new building.

    The Spa and Community Center opened October 2015, and houses a therapeutic tub, hair dresser, nail bar and massage therapist.

    Visit , Live it, Love it.

    ...



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    Harbour Hill offers the finest in seniors' living in Huron County: an exceptionally well-appointed retirement residence that incorporates the highest living standards in a small town setting. The staff and the facilities are the best in terms of professionalism. An onsite feature that clearly demonstrates a commitment to excellence is the Spa and Community Centre; here, there's a therapeutic tub and nail bar, as well as a hair dresser and massage therapist. For the guys, there are games rooms, card games, a movie night and other fun things to do. Fitness and activities are a staple of community life here, and residents love it.

    Aside from activity in the residence, you also get to enjoy life in "Canada's prettiest town." Even longtime residents of Huron County may not be aware of the local history, centred in the Huron County Museum. The main beach and Blue Water Beach are just two attractions that make this a place your kids and grandkids will be happy to visit.

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