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Long-term Care: Continuous Care For Your Loved One

Long-term Care: Continuous Care For Your Loved One

Long-term care: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Long-term care, also called nursing homes* in Canada, provides an ideal environment for your elderly loved one. Long-term care is designed to help bring seniors out of isolation and into a secure and safe community where all personal, medical and emotional needs will be well taken care of.

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Long Term Care Homes

The Village of Tansley Woods-4100 Upper Middle Road,Burlington,Ontario,L7W 4W8
 

The Village of Tansley Woods

4100 Upper Middle Road, Burlington, Ontario, L7W 4W8
Elegant Burlington, Ontario retirement home including everything from the current long term care to new independent living suites, offering various seniors services.

The Village of Humber Heights-2245 Lawrence Avenue West,Etobicoke,Ontario,M9P 3W3
 

The Village of Humber Heights

2245 Lawrence Avenue West, Etobicoke, Ontario, M9P 3W3
The Village of Humber Heights in Etobicoke offers different levels of service from independent apartments with meals to assisted living to long-term care.

The Village of Riverside Glen-60 Woodlawn Road East,Guelph,Ontario,N1H 8M8
 

The Village of Riverside Glen

60 Woodlawn Road East, Guelph, Ontario, N1H 8M8
This elegant Guelph retirement home offers a range of care including assisted living and long term care, serviced by a friendly, caring staff.

The Village of Taunton Mills-3800 Brock Sreet North,Whitby,Ontario,L1R 3A5
 

The Village of Taunton Mills

3800 Brock Sreet North, Whitby, Ontario, L1R 3A5
The Village of Taunton Mills in Whitby presents several levels of service from seniors' apartments with meals to assisted living to long-term care.

All Seniors Care - Ontario-260 Church Street,Stratford / Ottawa,Ontario,N5A 2R6
 

All Seniors Care - Ontario

260 Church Street, Stratford / Ottawa, Ontario, N5A 2R6
With homes in Stratford and Ottawa, Ontario, All Seniors Care encourages active and vibrant living in a supportive, comfortable and safe environment.

Qualicare-(Head Office) 3910 Bathurst St. Suite 404,Across Canada,,M3H 5Z3
 

Qualicare

(Head Office) 3910 Bathurst St. Suite 404, Across Canada, , M3H 5Z3
We specialize in caring for patients with ALS, Alzheimer’s, cancer and dementia. We also support people during and after hospital stays.

Harmony Court Estate-7197 Canada Way,Burnaby,British Columbia,V5E 4A6
 

Harmony Court Estate

7197 Canada Way, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5E 4A6
A top retirement home in the heart of Burnaby, BC offering seniors ease-of-living thanks to friendly staff, a hair salon, numerous landscaped gardens and much more.

The Wellington-1430 Upper Wellington Street,Hamilton,Ontario,L9A 5H3
 

The Wellington

1430 Upper Wellington Street, Hamilton, Ontario, L9A 5H3
This award winning Hamilton retiremetn home offers varying senior care,just minutes away from shopping, theatres, restaurants and major transportation links.

Riverwood Senior Living-9 Evans Road P.O. Box 938,Alliston,Ontario,L9R 1W1
 

Riverwood Senior Living

9 Evans Road P.O. Box 938, Alliston, Ontario, L9R 1W1
This Alliston, Ontario retirement home offers independent living and a variety of seniors' care including Alzheimer's support, PSW's and more.

Long-term care gives ailing seniors the chance to continue to participate in recreational and social activities as well as opportunities for companionship. In a long-term care residence, your loved one will have access to a level of care and support not possible at home.

Is long-term care the right option?

In Canada, long-term care (commonly known as nursing home care) is intended for seniors who need access to 24-hour care and daily support services for an array of physical and/or cognitive conditions, as deemed eligible by social service agencies. A wide range of care and different levels of service, including for dementia and Alzheimer's make this an ideal community for a wide variety of people with unique health needs.

Considering long-term care in Canada

When thinking about long-term care in Canada, it is absolutely imperative that you not wait for a crisis. You should discuss retirement home options now. As you embark on your search for long-term care, here are some important things to bear in mind:

  • Talk about preferences while your loved one's cognitive abilities are still intact
  • On-site tours are essential to get a good "feel" of the long term care home in person
  • Bring a close relative or a friend — several sets of eyes are better than one
  • Take a good look at the rooms or suites and imagine yourself staying there. Return for a second look or stay overnight if its available.
  • Stay for a meal or two
  • Don't be shy - ask staff lots of questions
  • Talk to current residents that live in the long term care home
  • Ask for references
  • Give yourself or your relative a reasonable amount of time to adjust to life in a new setting
Not sure how to talk to your parents about long-term care? Watch Comfort Life's The Talk for expert tips and advice on how and when to talk to your parents about their retirement options.

 

Points to consider when assessing your care needs
 

  • What specific care and support is required?
  • What cultural supports are important?
  • What spiritual supports are important?
  • What types of things will make the move to a long-term care residence comfortable?
  • Is 24-hour care and supervision required?
  • Is my relative's impairment cognitive, physical or both?
  • What would make me worry less about my care and safety, or that of my relative?


Some natural concerns for those facing long-term care
 

  • I don't want to go into an impersonal institution
  • I love my home and I don't want to part with my personal possessions
  • Will I be served familiar foods? Will I be understood in my mother tongue?
  • I have guilt pangs about putting my mom or dad "away"
  • Will my relative be well cared for in a compassionate manner?

Long-term care communities do their best to care for residents in a compassionate manner.  Some long-term care communities welcome some smaller furnishings and personal mementoes from home and some cater to particular cultural tastes, linguistic or religious backgrounds.

Ensure you ask the right questions and have all the answers you need to make a sound decision. For tips and advice about what to ask and look for when touring a long-term care residence, simply download our free eBook The Ultimate Retirement Tour Checklist.
 

How much does a long-term care residence cost?

The cost of a long-term care residence varies depending on where you live, the type or room you choose and the length of your stay. Basic or standard rooms are the least expensive and, in older buildings, tend to accommodate more than two residents. Semi-private or private rooms with more amenities are available, but do cost more.  If cost is a concern, consider that:

  • Subsidies for basic or standard rooms are available for seniors with a certain annual personal income at a certain level
  • Your costs may be covered by your provinces’ health care insurance

For more information about the costs of retirement in your provice visit our region guide

 

Nursing Homes

Within the senior care industry it is customary to correct people when they refer to "nursing homes." The phrase "nursing homes" has gone out of vogue as this entails that patients require constant nursing or it has become attached to negative media stories about abusive or neglectful treatment of the elderly. In any case, "nursing homes" is not used in the industry, where the phrase "long-term care" has a more modern, professional connotation.

 

Trends

  • Increased focus by regulators - greater opportunities for consumer input
  • Ward-style rooms are being phased out
  • More space, more privacy and intimate dining groupings in newer establishments
  • Easing the way for spouses to enter same long-term care homes
  • Pilot programs being studied to allow for increased use of long-term care communities as settings where individuals can

 

How to Assess home health-care services

  • Use a written checklist. Find examples on the websites of provider-based associations
  • Look beyond room size and decor, and consider the home's philosophy and mission. Who runs it? What is their approach? Does it gel with your own?
  • Is there a clear process for residents and their families to participate in care planning and delivery?
  • Is there a clear process for contacting relatives in an emergency?
  • Is it convenient for friends and relatives to visit?
  • Is the atmosphere welcoming?
  • Do residents have choices on such things as taking showers versus baths, when they go to bed or whether or not they choose to participate in activities?
  • Did staff clearly explain their policies on important issues such as safety restraints and administering medication?
  • Did the residents look well-groomed and appropriately dressed?
  • Do meals cater to residents' taste, cultural or religious requirements?
  • Is there a residents' council?
  • Is there a clearly defined process for registering and resolving complaints?

Compiled with the assistance of Karen Sullivan, executive director of the Ontario Long Term Care Association and the OLTCA website; Donna Rubin, CEO of the Ontario Association of Non-Profit Homes and Services for Seniors and the OANHSS' website; staff at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and its website; Statistics Canada's website

 

 

  • Trends
  • Increased focus by regulators - greater opportunities for consumer input
  • Ward-style rooms are being phased out
  • More space, more privacy and intimate dining groupings in newer establishments
  • Easing the way for spouses to enter same long-term care homes
  • Pilot programs being studied to allow for increased use of long-term care communities as settings where individuals can

  • How to Assess home health-care services
  • Use a written checklist. Find examples on the websites of provider-based associations
  • Look beyond room size and decor, and consider the home's philosophy and mission. Who runs it? What is their approach? Does it gel with your own?
  • Is there a clear process for residents and their families to participate in care planning and delivery?
  • Is there a clear process for contacting relatives in an emergency?
  • Is it convenient for friends and relatives to visit?
  • Is the atmosphere welcoming?
  • Do residents have choices on such things as taking showers versus baths, when they go to bed or whether or not they choose to participate in activities?
  • Did staff clearly explain their policies on important issues such as safety restraints and administering medication?
  • Did the residents look well-groomed and appropriately dressed?
  • Do meals cater to residents' taste, cultural or religious requirements?
  • Is there a residents' council?
  • Is there a clearly defined process for registering and resolving complaints?

Compiled with the assistance of Karen Sullivan, executive director of the Ontario Long Term Care Association and the OLTCA website; Donna Rubin, CEO of the Ontario Association of Non-Profit Homes and Services for Seniors and the OANHSS' website; staff at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and its website; Statistics Canada's website

 

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